11.09.14

Tangle Prevention - Darrell Peck

There’s nothing worse than reeling in a tangled rig. We’ve all been there - everything looks spot on, the carp are in the area, you’re sure you’re going to catch, but you don’t? Only to find that the rig was tangled all along and your time has been well and truly wasted. In this piece Darrell Peck is going to explain exactly how he goes about preventing tangles and ensuring that his rig is ready to do its job effectively.


The use of a leader or tubing will help to stop tangles from occurring. It is very important that you make sure that your rig is shorter than the tubing, for example, that you might be using, not doing so could easily work against you. The rigidity of your tubing/leader helps to keep the hook link safe during flight.

When tying your rigs, try using a coated braid straight through to the hooks eye. By leaving the coating intact you are reducing the movement near the hook, which should stop it from becoming tangled. The stiffer the coating, the less likely it is to tangle, monofilaments are especially good for this.

Use the right components. This might seem strange but I pay a lot off attention to how my components work together. When using things like Tail Rubbers, it’s important that they are ‘snug-fitting’. This will reduce any movement between each part of the lead arrangement, leaving less room for error.

Big hook baits, namely boilies, have always been a favourite of mine and for many years I was an avid user of 20mm baits. I used these large baits for a number of reasons but one of them was the way they cast, often kicking right out and away from the lead during flight. The smaller your hook bait is, the more tangle prone it will be once you’ve attached it to your rig.

Attaching a PVA stick is a great way of preventing tangles, it works in the same way that a large hook bait does, kicking the rig out and away from the lead. The added bonus of a stick is the way it protects your hook point and adds attraction the hook bait.

The use of a line clip has become more and more popular, for good reason too, it does several things that benefit us as anglers. One of these things is the way it helps prevent tangles when we cast. As the line hits the clip the lead and hook bait are bounced away from each other, ensuring that the two are not tangled.

This is a little tip for any fans of the drop-off inline arrangement. Rather than attaching the leader to the ring end of the swivel, attach it to the other end, bore out the plastic insert and then plug the swivel into the lead. By attaching the leader to the opposite end to the ring you are allowing the full movement of the ring swivel, rather than drastically reducing it, which could easily result in a tangle.

This is a little tip for any fans of the drop-off inline arrangement. Rather than attaching the leader to the ring end of the swivel, attach it to the other end, bore out the plastic insert and then plug the swivel into the lead. By attaching the leader to the opposite end to the ring you are allowing the full movement of the ring swivel, rather than drastically reducing it, which could easily result in a tangle.

My final tip is to watch everything during flight, all the above tips will help to reduce the chance of tangles but the only way to make sure is to watch in flight. As soon as that lead passes over my head I am watching it, following it as it travels towards the spot, whilst keep a close eye on the separation between the bait and the lead. Watching is the only way you can really be sure that it hasn’t tangled.


By taking all of these things into consideration I am sure that the amount of tangles you receive will be greatly reduced – I certainly hope so anyway.

Cheers,

Darrell.



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